Managing the Environmental Impact of Construction Projects

A single construction project can have a major impact on the environment in its immediate locality. Within a town or city, a number of concurrent projects can create congestion, increase risk to cyclists and pedestrians, increase noise and raise particulate emissions, a situation now evident within many towns and cities. This can cause hardship and blight for local residents, often for year after year. And with continuing low interest rates, and a government rightly intent on increasing investment in national...

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Warehouse Management Systems

The first warehouse management systems (WMS) appeared in the early 1980’s.  Some were commercial applications, others written in-house using languages now rendered long obsolete. What these early efforts had in common was that they did not support the basic routines and disciplines that we would nowadays regard as essential. Many of these applications have now been replaced but it is staggering how many companies still use systems that are 15, 20 or even 30 years old and completely unfit for...

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Is automation the answer to your supply chain?

Over the past 25 years The Logistics Business has built a wealth of experience across the supply chain spectrum, particularly within automation. A fundamental cornerstone of our expertise is finding the right solution for the right business. There are substantial benefits to the installation of automation, however there are several key questions a business must answer before engaging with a supplier. Post 2008 recession, firms have placed an increased financial squeeze onto the supply chain by increasing the importance of defining...

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Why does Sainsbury’s want to buy Argos?

Like other food retailers, Sainsbury’s has employed a traditional business model. That is, they put stock on the shelves and let customers browse, select what they want, and pay for it at the checkout. In its race for market share as Tesco has extended the use of this model to add non-food lines. The problem is that this has meant that the retailer has had to construct ever larger super-stores which are now looking increasingly obsolete in the face of discounters,...

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Extending Consumer Choice in Automotive Manufacturing

In 1913, Henry Ford finished implementing the assembly line at the Highland Park, Michigan assembly plant for the Model T Ford. This line revolutionised production as the concept of moving a chassis along a track comprising 84 assembly stations with a specific task performed at each, reduced throughput time from days to just 2½ hrs. Ford’s approach was perfect given that he was producing a car with no options and no accessories and which famously was available “in any colour...

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